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  • Washington Mum as France, Germany Arm Russia

    Amidst the ongoing aerial campaign against Muammar Qadhafi’s forces in Libya, NATO is struggling with a problem that is affecting the integrity of the alliance. Arms producers in France, Italy, and Germany are selling advanced weapons, sensitive dual-use systems, and military supplies to Russia. These military sales to Moscow, which … More

    As Heritage Predicted, Bin Laden Planned Attacks on Energy Infrastructure

    Materials obtained in the U.S. SEAL raid that killed Osama bin Laden confirm what Heritage suspected all along: Al-Qaeda considered attacking tanker ships and other maritime energy infrastructure. Bin Laden expected to drive up the price of oil and intended to cause considerable damage to the U.S. and other oil-dependent … More

    After bin Laden’s Death, Al-Qaeda Turns to the North Caucasus

    After Osama bin Laden’s death, it is clear that the war on terrorism is not over. Ayman al-Zawahiri, the former al-Qaeda’s number two, may take over as bin Laden’s heir, unless the interim operations leader Saif al-Adel, the former Egyptian commando with Iranian ties, gets the job. In the meantime, … More

    Stop Relying on Russian Aircraft

    The United States is increasingly relying on the Russian Federation for supplying U.S. forces stationed in Iraq and Afghanistan. This is because the U.S. does not have enough C-17 military transport aircraft to address all of its logistical needs and meet its commitments around the world. Freedom is not free, … More

    Russia Fighting to Save Arms Sales to the Middle East

    Ambitious efforts to modernize Russia’s defense and industrial base undertaken during the Putin administration have been paying off—at least, in some cases. The Russian leadership uses arms sales for economic gain, but also as a tool of influence in the recipient countries. The Russian military-industrial complex, one of the few … More

    Putin and Medvedev Break Up over Libya

    Russia originally abstained from vetoing the U.N. Security Council resolution allowing operation “Odyssey Dawn” in Libya. Now, however, Moscow is changing its tune: Russia has called for an immediate cease-fire because of the claims of “high civilian casualties.” In other words, as long as Libyan dictator Muammar Qadhafi was killing … More

    Emerging Threats in the Middle East

    HERZLIYA, ISRAEL. Emergence of a nuclear Iran; turmoil in Egypt and destabilization of secular, pro-Western Middle Eastern states; blurring of the lines between unconventional, conventional, and low-intensity conflicts; explosion of information challenges in and around the battlefields—all of these concerns will increasingly challenge U.S. and regional policymakers and military commanders … More

    Middle East Security Deteriorates

    Two years of President Barak Obama’s Middle Eastern foreign policy, and especially its handling of the Egyptian revolution, earned poor marks at Israel’s flagship national security event, the Herzliya Conference. The prestigious conference attracted NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen, U.K. Defense Minister Liam Fox, U.S. Assistant Secretary of Defense Alexander … More

    BP–Rosneft Deal: Beyond Energy

    On January 15, British Petroleum (BP) agreed to form a joint venture with Russia’s state-owned Rosneft to develop three of Rosneft’s offshore exploration blocks in northern Russia. The two companies will jointly explore for oil and gas in the Russian Arctic, one of the world’s last remaining unexplored hydrocarbon basins. … More

    Meet Katya, a New Mata Hari

    On December 5, British security detained Katya Zatuliveter, also known as the “British Anne Champan.” Anne, or Anya, was a redheaded Russian spy arrested in the U.S. and sent back home packing—to a meeting with Vladimir Putin, which led to a lucrative career on Russian TV. Now, it’s Katya’s turn: … More