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  • Yearly Archives: 2012

    VIDEO: The Reality of America's National Debt

    America’s total debt now tops $15.2 trillion—the size of the entire economy. While this is a real concern, the greater problem is the growth of spending and debt in the future. Spending on entitlements is the real driver of future debt. In this clip from the documentary film “I Want … More

    NFL Players' Union Opposes Right-to-Work

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    The NFL Players Association just came out against Indiana’s proposed right-to-work law. This is not too surprising: Even the poorest NFL player makes $390,000 a year. The average NFL player makes $1.9 million. NFL players make enough to barely notice union dues. They also have jobs. Right-to-work makes little difference … More

    Three New Year's "Edu-lutions" for Policymakers

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    Like the rest of us, state and local policymakers across the country probably made New Year’s resolutions to eat healthier, exercise more, and finish those languishing projects around the house. Here’s hoping they’ll also add three education resolutions to their list. The year 2012 will be pivotal for education policy. … More

    Heritage Mourns Loss of Tony Blankley

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    Heritage Foundation President Edwin J. Feulner today issued the following statement on the death of former Heritage Fellow Tony Blankley: Tony Blankley was a man of principle and passion. A penetrating analyst and compelling commentator, he was a straight shooter who never missed his mark. As press secretary and advisor … More

    A Decade After No Child Left Behind, Time for a Right Turn in Education

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    No Child Left Behind (NCLB) turned 10 yesterday, and the anniversary is a good time to assess the toll of federal education intervention and to identify steps Congress can take now toward restoring constitutional governance in education. Eight legislative generations before NCLB, Washington first ventured into local school policy with … More

    Sackett v. EPA: Supreme Court Takes Up Property Rights Case

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    Today the Supreme Court will hear oral argument in Sackett v. EPA, one of the most important property rights cases to reach the Court in recent history.  The case involves a complicated statutory scheme created by the Clean Water Act (CWA), which (as relevant here) is enforced by the EPA. … More

    Morning Bell: Can America Defend Itself?

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    The Iranian threat yet again finds itself on the front page of America’s newspapers this morning, this time with news that the rogue regime has sentenced a U.S. citizen to death for working for the CIA and that it has started refining uranium deep inside a mountain bunker. Meanwhile, Iranian … More

    Chart of the Week: Defense Spending Throughout U.S. History

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    President Obama visited the Pentagon on Thursday to outline his plan for gutting our nation’s military. Obama’s vision makes America more vulnerable to foreign threats and leaves our armed forces less able to provide for the common defense. As we’ve previously illustrated, Obama has proposed significant reductions to the Pentagon’s … More

    Scribecast: How One Couple Took on EPA and Ended Up at Supreme Court

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    Mike and Chantell Sackett just wanted to build their dream home in the Idaho panhandle. Instead, they’re headed to the U.S. Supreme Court in a long-running dispute with the Environmental Protection Agency, which claims their property is wetlands. The case is among the most watched before the court this year. … More

    Wage and Price Stickiness and Economic Recovery

    US DOLLARS

    In a weak economy, the government should not erect barriers to hiring. But two government policies have hindered the already slow recovery: increases in the minimum wage and government unionization. Eliminating these policies would not be enough to spur a robust recovery—the cause of our current economic weakness goes far … More