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  • Monthly Archives: June 2011

    General Motors CEO Wants Higher Gas Prices

    General Motors $4.3 billion loss

    If General Motors CEO Dan Akerson had anything to say about it, you would be paying a dollar more a gallon for gas. Yes, with $4/gallon prices hitting consumers in a tough economy, Akerson told the Detroit News: “You know what I’d rather have them do — this will make … More

    Federal Government's Debt, Unfunded Obligations Grew Rapidly Last Year

    Silhouetted Lincoln Memorial, Washington Monument and Capitol Building with American flag at sunrise in Washington DC

    According to a new analysis from USA Today, American households are now on the hook for $534,000 to pay for the county’s debt and the unfunded obligations, or excess costs, for programs like Social Security and Medicare. USA Today reveals the eye-popping numbers for the federal government’s mounting fiscal problems. … More

    Rep. Paul Ryan: America Exceptional at Home and Abroad

    Paul Ryan (R-WI), the champion of necessary but unpopular fiscal reform, spoke this month about America’s exceptional political ideas and how they should be reflected in our foreign policy. In so doing he rejected isolationism and reinforced the Founders’ commitment to making America an indispensable nation for the cause of … More

    Deciphering the Left’s Medicare Playbook

    spy-magnifying-glass-woman

    It’s a simple fact: You can’t sustain Medicare unless you transform the current—and unaffordable—system. But the left continues to falsely decry conservatives’ plans to achieve this, accusing them of plotting to end the program altogether. It’s ironic, then, that the left has diligently pursued a strategy of its own to … More

    Senate Considers Bills to Protect Consumers, Small Business

    U.S. Capitol

    The Senate is looking to do some more spending with a vote today on the Economic Development Revitalization Act, which will cost $1.5 billion through 2016 and an additional $760 million thereafter. The goal? Reauthorize funding for the Economic Development Administration — a vehicle for political pet projects, masked as … More

    Government Shouldn’t Decide What Cars Run On

    gas_feature

    With gas prices hovering at $4 per gallon, politicians are trying to sell quick fixes that will inevitably end up hurting consumers. The latest attempt is an open fuel standard that would require a certain percentage of new vehicles to be flex-fuel (a combination of gasoline and ethanol or methanol), … More

    Wisconsin Presses Forward on School Choice

    students-classroom-11-6-7

    Wisconsin is home to the longest-running and largest school choice program in the nation. Now, state legislators are taking steps to open wider the doors of educational opportunities for families in the Badger State. For the last 20 years, Wisconsin students have benefited from the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program (MPCP), … More

    Today in History: The Call For Independence

    american-flag-11-6-7

    On June 7, 1776, Richard Henry Lee, a delegate from Virginia, stood in front of the Second Continental Congress and committed treason by proposing a resolution to declare that “these United States are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States, that they are absolved from all allegiance … More

    Lawmakers Press HHS for Information on Controversial Obamacare Waivers

    Kansas Governor Kathleen Sebelius (D-KS)

    Wondering how all those businesses in House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s district ended up with Obamacare waivers? The story drew national attention last month, but there’s still little known about the process used by the Obama administration to grant the controversial waivers. That’s prompted more than 30 members of Congress … More

    Morning Bell: Obama's Jobless America

    The economic news keeps getting worse for America. Last month, the unemployment rate went up to 9.1 percent, the economy added only 54,000 jobs, and the average length of unemployment rose to more than nine months, the longest since the Labor Department started keeping track in 1948. But despite all … More